Marketing

Overview

The Marketing Division at the Leeds School of Business is distinguished by its scholarly impact on academic marketing thought and by exceptional teaching. Research by our faculty is our strength. Research is published in prestigious publications such as Journal of Consumer Research. Our faculty bring marketing theory and practical solutions to students and prepare them for careers in business and in academics.

The increasingly global marketplace, coupled with new communication vehicles such as the Internet, have changed the traditional tactics used in marketing. Today's marketing practitioners must understand the unique challenges of serving foreign markets and how to effectively convey their messages to consumers throughout the world. The marketing program develops students' analytic and decision-making skills in such areas as advertising, market research, brand/product management, selling and sales management, distribution, relationship marketing, international marketing, marketing consumer products and services, and marketing nonprofit organizations.

Key concepts focus on identifying customer needs and wants, developing products and services to meet those demands, establishing communications to promote products and services, and monitoring transactions and customer responses to guide future activities. Marketing concepts apply to tangible products, services and ideas, consumer and business markets, and domestic and global markets.

Career Opportunities

Marketing students find career opportunities in advertising, international marketing, marketing research, nonprofit marketing, product and brand management, personal selling, public relations, retail management, sales management, business-to-business marketing, consumer affairs and protection, and distribution and logistics. Sales, the most common entry-level position, is the area in which the most number of jobs exist. A sales job is widely used as a stepping stone to a management career.

Undergraduate Requirements

The marketing area of emphasis takes at least three semesters to complete and requires 18 credit hours. Students should be aware of these requirements when planning their course schedules. Students in the marketing program are strongly advised to complete BCOR 1020 and 2400 in the first semester of their sophomore year. Students pursuing the marketing area of emphasis and planning to graduate in four years must complete MKTG 3250 and MKTG 3350 in their junior year.

The increasingly global marketplace, coupled with new communication vehicles such as the Internet, have changed the traditional tactics used in marketing. Today's marketing practitioners must understand the unique challenges of serving foreign markets and how to effectively convey their messages to consumers throughout the world. The marketing program develops students' analytic and decision-making skills in such areas as advertising, market research, brand/product management, selling and sales management, distribution, relationship marketing, international marketing, marketing consumer products and services, and marketing nonprofit organizations.

Key concepts focus on identifying customer needs and wants, developing products and services to meet those demands, establishing communications to promote products and services, and monitoring transactions and customer responses to guide future activities. Marketing concepts apply to tangible products, services and ideas, consumer and business markets, and domestic and global markets.

Career Opportunities

Marketing students find career opportunities in advertising, international marketing, marketing research, nonprofit marketing, product and brand management, personal selling, public relations, retail management, sales management, business-to-business marketing, consumer affairs and protection, and distribution and logistics. Sales, the most common entry-level position, is the area in which the most number of jobs exist. A sales job is widely used as a stepping stone to a management career.

Required Courses for Marketing Majors who entered the Leeds School in or after Fall 2009

The marketing area of emphasis takes at least three semesters to complete and requires 18 credit-hours. Students should be aware of these requirements when planning their course schedules. Students in the marketing program are strongly advised to complete BCOR 1020 and 2400 in the first semester of their sophomore year. Students pursuing the marketing area of emphasis and planning to graduate in four years must complete MKTG 3250 and MKTG 3350 in their junior year.

After completing BCOR 2400, students should take:

  • MKTG 3250: Buyer Behavior (3 credits)
  • MKTG 3350: Marketing Research (3 credits)

After completing MKTG 3250 and MKTG 3350 students must complete these three 4000-level MKTG area courses from the following list, at least two of which must be completed prior to taking MKTG 4850, with the third taken prior to, or concurrent with, MKTG 4850.

  • MKTG 4250: Product Strategy (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4300: Pricing and Channels of Distribution (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4550: Advertising and Promotion Management (3 credits)

Students pursuing a marketing area of emphasis may not take 4000-level marketing courses concurrently with MKTG 3250 or MKTG 3350.

  • MKTG 4850: Senior Seminar in Marketing (3 credits)

Required Courses for Marketing Majors who entered the Leeds School Prior to Fall 2009

After completing BCOR 2400, take:

  • MKTG 3250: Buyer Behavior (3 credits)
  • MKTG 3350: Marketing Research (3 credits)

After completing MKTG 3250 and MKTG 3350 you must complete at least three 4000-level MKTG area courses from the following list:

  • MKTG 4150 [Now MKTG 3150]: Sales Management (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4250: Product Strategy (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4350: Services Marketing Strategy (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4400 [Now MKTG 3450]: International Marketing (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4550: Advertising and Promotion Management (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4650: Institutional Relationships and Strategy (3 credits)
  • MKTG 4825: Pricing and Channel Strategies (3 credits)

Students pursuing a marketing area of emphasis may not take 4000-level marketing courses concurrently with MKTG 3250 or MKTG 3350. After finishing at least two 4000-level marketing area courses, students must complete the capstone course in marketing.

  • MKTG 4850: Senior Seminar in Marketing (3 credits)

Courses

BCOR 2400: Fundamentals of Marketing

Undergraduate

Examines how activities in organizations provide value to the purchasers of its products and services. Includes gathering information about consumers and competitors through research and information systems, applying knowledge and technology to the design of products and services, communicating information to consumers and organizational units, and pricingand distributing products and services. Also includes issues in global marketing, ethics and diversity, relationship marketing, and integrating marketing with financial analyses. Prereq., BCOR 1010, BCOR 1020. Coreq., second semester of ECON series. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors, and 26 hours completed. Formerly BCOR 2050.


MBAC 6090: Marketing Management

MBA

Develop your ability to establish marketing strategies as a source of competitive advantage.

Syllabus


MKTG 3150: Sales Management

Undergraduate

Explores the selling task and the essentials of managing the sales force. Includes recruiting, selecting and hiring, training, compensating, supervising, and controlling. Covers sales organization, sales planning, sales forecasting, assigning territories, quotas, and sales analysis. Prereq., BCOR 2400. Restricted to students with 52 hours completed. Formerly MKTG 4150.


MKTG 3250: Buyer Behavior

Undergraduate

Covers both consumer buying behavior and organizational buying behavior.


MKTG 3350: Marketing Research

Undergraduate

Explores fundamental techniques of data collection and analysis used to solve marketing problems. Specific topics include problem definition, planning an investigation, developing questionnaires, sampling, tabulation, interpreting results, and preparing and presenting a final report. Required for marketing majors. Prereqs., BCOR 1020 and BCOR 2050 or 2400. Restricted to students with 52 hours completed.


MKTG 3450: International Marketing

Undergraduate

Describes the economic, geographic, political, and social forces that have shaped and continue to define global markets. Examines topics critical to success in international markets, including assessment of a firm's international capabilities, techniques for gauging the potential of international markets, international segmentation approaches, and alternative arrangements for entering foreign markets. Compares and contrasts product, price, distribution, logistics, promotion, and research decisions made in global versus domestic markets. Introduces students to financial arrangements characteristic of international marketing, including exchange rates and controls, balance-of-payment principles, import licensing agreements and tariffs. Prereq., BCOR 2400. Formerly MKTG 4400.


MKTG 3825: Digital Marketing

Undergraduate: Fall 2011

Digital marketing means using an online presence to support your business. The course covers fundamental strategic questions, tools, habits, and resources for identifying new trends.

Syllabus


MKTG 4550: Advertising and Promotion Management

Undergraduate

Analyzes advertising and promotion principles and practices from the marketing manager's point of view. Considers the decision to advertise, market analysis as a planning phase of the advertising program, media selection, public relations, sales promotion, promotion budgets, campaigns, evaluation of results, and agency relations. Prereqs., MKTG 3250 and 3350.


MKTG 4825: Experimental Seminar: Pricing Strategies and Channels Management

Undergraduate

Offered irregularly to provide opportunity for investigation of new frontiers in Marketing. Restricted to juniors/seniors.


MKTG 4850: Senior Seminar in Marketing

Undergraduate

This capstone marketing course integrates and further develops what students have learned in other courses. Provides students with the insight and skills necessary to formulate and implement sound socially responsible marketing strategies, product line management strategies, promotional and product/service communication strategies, pricing, and distribution strategies. Prereqs., MKTG 3250, 3350, two additional 4000-level MKTG courses, and 102 hours completed. Restricted to MKTG majors. Formerly BCOR 4004.


MKTG 7310: Design and Analysis of Experiments in Business

Undergraduate

Detailed exposure to experimental research methods for business applications. Emphasizes the choice of design options, data collection methods, statistical analysis, and substantive interpretation of experimental results.


MKTG 7825: Doctoral Seminar: Empirical Models in Marketing

Ph.D.

Presents state-of-the-art empirical modeling techniques (both reduced-form and structural) used by marketing scientists, as well as discuss the key findings generated from major empirical studies. Acquaint the class participants with the systematic process of conducting rigorous empirical marketing research, enable them to read and critically review empirical papers in leading marketing journals and, ultimately, start doing independent empirical research. Prereq., a graduate course in regression.


Video

Becoming a Leeds Students: Alice Fennelly, Part I

Between school, two jobs, and time devoted to family and friends, Alice Fennelly (marketing '14) takes advantage of every opportunity to build relationships. One of her most valuable connections is with her mentor, Claudia Batten.

Students

Erin Carter
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 464
Ji Hoon Jhang
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Bridget Leonard
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 469
Andrew Long
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 463
Heeyoung “Lauren” Min
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 463
Paul Parkinson
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 464
Julie Schiro
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 465
Abigail Schneider
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 469
Allison Scott
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 464
An T. Tran
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 458
Curriculum Vitae

News

Consumers Differ in Desire for Explanation

Leeds School of Business

September 18, 2012

The depth of explanation about novel products influences consumer preferences and willingness to pay, according to a study led by assistant professor of marketing, Phil Fernbach. The study led to the discovery of "explanation foes" and "explanation fiends."


CU Boulder: Negative associations of celebrity endorsers more transferable than positive

Daily Camera

June 24, 2012

Daily Camera features Margaret Campbell's research on celebrity endorsements. Unfortunately, negative associations of celebrity transfer to a brand more than positive associations. The study warns companies to consider the possible negative associations that can transfer to their brand.


Study cites celebrity endorsements' risks

Boulder County Business Report

June 22, 2012

Professor at the Leeds School of Business, Margaret Campbell, released research about the impacts of celebrity endorsements. Campbell's findings show that negative celebrity associations always transfer to an endorsed brand while positive associations may not.


How Celebrity Endorsements Can Backfire

Time

June 22, 2012

Professor of Marketing Meg Campbell's research is featured in Time. Time discusses how a celebrity's endorsement has the ability to potentially harm a brand instead of promoting it. If paired with the wrong product, the celebrity's negative personality traits will transfer to the brand. The article discusses the negative impact of Jessica Simpson, Kim Kardashian and Tiger Woods.


Celebrity endorsements not always a good bet, CU-Boulder study shows

University of Colorado Boulder

June 20, 2012

Margaret Campbell, professor of marketing at the Leeds School of Business, released a study about celebrity endorsement and the impact on companies' brand. Campbell finds that both the positive and negative personality traits of the celebrity transfer to the brand and urges marketers to be careful.


Publications

Publication

Seeing is Eating: How and When Activation of Negative Stereotype Increases Stereotype-Conductive Behavior

October 2011

Authors: Margaret C. Campbell and Gina S. Mohr

This research investigates the effect of activation of a negative stereotype on behaviors that are perceived to increase the chance of becoming a member of the stereotyped group.

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Article

Six of One, Half Dozen of the Other: Expanding and Contracting Numerical Dimensions Produces Preference Reversals

June 2009

Authors: Lynch, John G., Jr., et al.

Two studies show that simply increasing the size of an attribute’s scale systematically changes its weight in both multiattribute preferences and willingness to pay: Expanding scales on one attribute shifts preferences to alternatives favored on that attribute.

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Article

Construing Consumer Decision Making

May 2007

Author: John G. Lynch, et. al.

Construal-level theory articulates how psychological distance alters the mental representation of inputs. In the distance consumers weight abstract "high level" criteria, but when close at hand, concrete "low level" criteria get more weight. We explain how these shifts in perspective can change consumers' consideration sets and can lead regret and dissatisfaction with purchases.

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Article

How to Attract Customers by Giving Them the Short End of the Stick

February 2007

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., et al.

In six experiments, the authors show conditions under which exactly the opposite can occur; that is, consumers judge the same offer to be more attractive when a seller offers a better price or more benefits to another group than when the seller treats everyone equally.

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Article

Accessibility-Diagnosticity and the Multiple Pathway Anchoring and Adjustment Model

June 2006

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr.

I discuss how the Multiple Pathway Anchoring and Adjustment model is similar to and different from the Feldman and Lynch accessibility-diagnosticity model, elaborated as an anchoring and adjustment model by Lynch, Marmorstein, andWeigold.

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Article

When Do You Want It? Time, Decisions, and Public Policy

April 2006

Authors: John G. Lynch, Jr. and Gal Zauberman

Consumers steeply discount future outcomes compared to similar outcomes in the present. We examine the implications of research on discounting the future for public policy in domains where consumers' impulsiveness can be harmful: under-saving for retirement; choice of tasty but unhealthy foods; falling for the lure of rebates one will never redeem.

Full Publication


Article

Decision Neuroscience

June 2005

Authors: Baba Shiv, Susan J. Grant, A. Peter McGraw, et. al.

An introduction to and analysis of the emerging research area of decision neuroscience.

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Article

Accessible but Nondiagnostic Memories about Memory and Consumer Choice

May 2005

Author: John G. Lynch, Jr.

Professor John Lynch's Paul D. Converse Award Winning Paper.

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Article

Resource Slack and Discounting of Future Time versus Money

January 2005

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., Gal Zauberman

The authors demonstrate that people discount delayed outcomes as a result of perceived changes over time in supplies of slack.

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Article

Learning by Collaborative and Individual-Based Recommendation Agents

January 2004

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., et al.

In this work we examine the learning function that results from these 2 general types of learning-smart agents.

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Article

Smart Agents: When Lower Search Costs for Quality Information Increase Price Sensitivity

June 2003

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., Laura Kornish, Kristin Diehl

We argue that lowering quality search costs by smart agents can have the opposite effect on differentiation and price sensitivity.

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Article

Prior Knowledge and Complacency in New Product Learning

December 2002

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., et al.

Our research examines the role of prior knowledge in learning new product information.

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Article

Unobserved Heterogeneity as an Alternative Explanation for “Reversal” Effects in Behavioral Research

December 2000

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., et al.

We show that, despite using internally valid experimental designs such as this, aggregation biases can arise in which the theoretically critical pattern holds in the aggregate even though it holds for no (or few) individuals.

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Article

Wine Online: Search Costs Affect Competition on Price, Quality, and Distribution

November 2000

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr., et al.

We test conditions under which lowered search costs should increase or decrease price sensitivity.

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Article

Theory and External Validity

January 1999

Author: Lynch, John G., Jr.

External validity can only be “assessed” by better understanding how the focal variables in one’s theory interact with moderator variables that are seen as irrelevant early in a research stream.

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Article

Interactive home shopping: Consumer, retailer, and manufacturer incentives to participate in electronic marketplaces

July 1997

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

A study examines the implications of electronic shopping for consumers, retailers, and manufacturers.

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Article

Thinking About Values in Prospect and Retrospect: Maximizing Experienced Utility

June 1996

Authors: John G. Lynch, Jr.; et. al.

This paper explores the implications of making decisions by maximizing experienced utility ex post rather than ex ante.

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Article

Advertising Effects on Consumer Welfare: Prices Paid and Liking for Brands Selected

January 1996

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This paper reports two experiments that explore the welfare implications of advertising effects.

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Article

Toward a Reconciliation of Market Power and Information Theories of Advertising Effects on Price Elasticity

March 1995

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This paper examines how advertisements that increase price elasticity in some decision environments decreased it in others

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Article

Communication Effects of Advertising vs. Direct Experience When Both Search and Experience Attributes are Present

March 1995

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

Multiple experiments looking at the communication effects of advertising versus direct experience when multiple attributes are present

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Article

A Bayesian Analysis of the Information Value of Manipulation and Confounding Checks in Theory Tests

March 1995

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

We use a Bayesian analysis to examine what such measures contribute to researchers' beliefs about competing theories and suggest when and why manipulation and confounding checks add to the ability to differentiate among alternative theoretical explanations of empirical results.

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Article

Regulatory Measurement and Evaluation of Telephone Service Quality

March 1994

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

We develop a bootstrapped method for formalizing each expert regulator's evaluation policy using hierarchical conjoint analysis, and apply this method to the evaluation of local telephone companies by the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC). We show that experts within the FPSC, the regulated utilities, and a large telephone customer exhibit very high agreement about how the various dimensions of quality should be differentially weighted.

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Article

Capturing and Creating Public Opinion in Survey Research

September 1993

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This article discusses the implications of two experimental results for consumer judgement processes and for measurement of consumers attitudes and intentions.

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Article

Hypothesized and Confounded Explanations in Theory Tests: A Bayesian Analysis

September 1992

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This paper presents a Bayesian analysis of hypothesis testing to model knowledge accumulation from a series of confounded or unconfounded experiments

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Article

The Measurement and Encouragement of Telephone Service Quality

January 1992

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., Sanford Berg

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the measurement, evaluation and encouragement of telephone service quality.

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Article

Contrast Effects in Consumer Judgments: Changes in Mental Representations or in the Anchoring of Rating Scales?

December 1991

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This paper presents a framework for distinguishing between contrasting effects on the basis of whether changes in mean ratings of multiattribute stimuli are accompanied by evidence of changes in their rank order.

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Article

Inference Effects Without Inference Making? Effects of Missing Information on Discounting and Use of Presented Information

March 1991

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This article interrogates effects of missing information in discounting the use of presented information.

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Article

Memory and Decision Making

January 1991

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

This chapter focuses on consumer memory and how it influences consumer choice.

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Article

Effects of Cue Consistency and Value on Base-Rate Utilization

February 1989

Author: Lynch, John G. Jr., et. al.

In two experiments using Bayesian probability judgement tasks, we examined the effects of numerical values of base rates and case cues, the degree of consistency in these values, and the narrowness of the populations to which these cues pertained.

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Contact

  • 303.492.1487