Ph.D.

Overview

The Ph.D. program prepares students for research and teaching careers at leading universities by focusing on original research and dissemination of knowledge through teaching and publication. The areas of study offered for the Ph.D. program are: Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Information Systems, Operations Management, Strategic, Organizational, and Entrepreneurial Studies.

Approximately 45 Ph.D. students are enrolled in the program. The number is small so that students can benefit from a high faculty-to-student ratio. In this setting faculty encourage graduate students to present at conferences, coauthor papers, and develop successful dissertations that appear in academic journals.

“The program provided me with invaluable opportunities to coauthor research papers with seasoned academics while also forming wonderful professional friendships with fellow Ph.D. students,” explains Marilyn Uy ('09 Ph.D.), Assistant Professor, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Students in the Ph.D. Program work with faculty as research assistants and they teach classes. This prepares scholars for academic careers (at professorial positions in colleges and universities) as seen by the near 100 percent placement rate for graduates.

“The faculty are extremely committed and devote a significant amount of their time to the Ph.D. program and student success,” says Amar Cheema (’02 Ph.D.), Associate Professor of Commerce, McIntire School of Commerce, University of Virginia.

After reading over our website, if you would like to discuss the Ph.D. program in more detail, please contact the faculty member who is the doctoral director for the area of study you are interested in. Their names and contact information are available on the Staff page.

To get a student's perspective on our program you may contact any of the Doctoral Business Student Assocation members.

Admissions

The goal of the Ph.D. program at the Leeds School of Business is to prepare students for careers in research and teaching at major universities so applicants are evaluated on their prospects of becoming leading scholars. Admission decisions are made based on a variety of factors including previous academic performance, work experience, test scores, letters of recommendation, research interests, and any other activities that present evidence of tenacity and scholarly potential.

Areas of Study

Graduates of the doctoral program at the Leeds School of Business earn a Ph.D. in Business Administration though they specialize in one area of study. At the time of application to the program students select from the following choices: Accounting; Finance; Marketing; Information Management; Operations Management; or Strategic, Organizational, and Entrepreneurial Studies.

Accounting

The accounting doctoral program provides students with a deep understanding of the most influential, modern accounting research, and with the tools needed to contribute state-of-the-art research that advances the discipline. Faculty will help you formulate interesting research questions and provide you with the training you need to obtain answers.

You will have the opportunity to take seminars from outstanding faculty in accounting, finance, and economics. Our program is built around intensive mentoring relationships between students and faculty, and the faculty consider it a privilege to work with outstanding Ph.D. students.

For more information about the accounting doctoral program contact Professor Yonca Ertimur at yonca.ertimur@colorado.edu.

Finance

Finance faculty and Ph.D. students study empirical and theoretical issues in corporate finance, structure of securities markets, valuation and asset pricing, derivatives, corporate governance, and information economics. Faculty look for applicants who have a depth of knowledge in specialized areas of finance and economics, strong command of research skills, and strong verbal and written communication skills.

For more information about the finance doctoral program contact Professor Nathalie Moyen at nathalie.moyen@colorado.edu.

Marketing

The marketing doctoral program places a very strong emphasis on developing research skills in preparation for productive careers at top research universities. Through a variety of coursework and research assistantship assignments where students work in collaborative relationships with faculty, students gain the skills necessary to conduct research that contributes to knowledge in the consumer behavior and marketing disciplines. Research interests of the marketing faculty and Ph.D. students includes consumer preferences and behavior, marketing communication and persuasion, auction marketing, new product introductions, pricing, and social responsibility. Research methods employed include empirical methods, theoretical modeling, and ethnographic studies.

For more information about the marketing doctoral program contact Professor Peter McGraw at peter.mcgraw@colorado.edu.

Information and Operations Management

The objective of the Ph.D. program in operations and information management is to prepare students for a career in university research and teaching. The curriculum will vary based on the research interests and background of a student.

Research interests of the information management faculty include developing and testing behavioral theory of the individual and organizational uses of information technology, as well as technical issues in knowledge management and information retrieval. Research interests of the operations management faculty include the creation, understanding, and solution of mathematical models that represent important problems in business, economics, operations management, and resource allocation.

For more information about the information and operations management doctoral program contact Professor Thomas Vossen at thomas.vossen@colorado.edu.

Strategic, Organizational, and Entrepreneurial Studies

The Ph.D. program in strategic, organizational, and entrepreneurial studies emphasizes state-of-the-art research on firm strategy or organizational science, particularly as it applies to entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship. We define entrepreneurship broadly to encompass startup processes, innovation management, and new venture development. Many of our faculty and Ph.D. students research topics which bridge strategy and entrepreneurship, including entrepreneurial dynamics within and entry into industries, innovation and knowledge spillover across firms, opportunity exploitation, and social ventures. Other research topics bridge organizational science and entrepreneurship, including entrepreneurial cognition and decision making, startup team dynamics, organizational emergence, opportunity identification, career mobility, and self-employment.

For more information about the strategic, organizational, and entrepreneurial studies doctoral program contact Professor Tony Tong at tony.tong@colorado.edu.

Testimonial

Based on the program's outstanding reputation in entrepreneurship—my area of study—I had high expectations for my time at Colorado. I can say today, without any doubt, that my experience at CU-Boulder exceeded those already high expectations.

The management department faculty were engaged, and always supportive of the students. I think what I appreciate most about the program was the fact that Ph.D. students were viewed as an integral part of the research community at the school. The faculty at Boulder encouraged internal research seminars, workshops, and they were always willing to engage me in discussion about my research.

Pursuing my Ph.D. at Colorado was certainly one of the most enjoyable and rewarding experiences in my life, and I am proud to call myself a graduate of the University.

J. Michael Haynie (Ph.D. '05)
Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship
Whitman School of Management
Syracuse University

Ph.D. Placements

The Leeds Ph.D.: program prepares graduates for academic careers at great universities all over the U.S. and the world. Here is a sampling of recent placements.

Accounting

  • Jeremy Michaels
    Ph.D.: 2014
    Placement: University of Pennsylvania
    Dissertation: Essays on Disclosure
  • Paige Patrick
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: University of Washington
    Dissertation: Essays in Executive Compensation
  • Troy Pollard
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: University of Alabama
    Dissertation: Sneaking in the Back Door? An Evaluation of Reverse Mergers and IPOs
  • Kristin Luttecke
    Ph.D.: 2012
    Placement: University of North Carolina, Charlotte
    Dissertation: Expectations Management Around Fixed Date Stock Option Grants
  • Sanghyuk Byun
    Ph.D.: 2012
    Placement: Sogang University, Korea
    Dissertation: Determinants and Implications of Executive Pay Dispersion and Compensation to Investor Relations Officers
  • Brian Burnett
    Ph.D.: 2011
    Placement: Indiana University, Bloomington
    Dissertation: Essays on Disclosure and Legal Origin
  • Curtis Nicholls
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Placement: Bucknell University
    Dissertation: The Impact of Accounting & Auditing Enforcement Actions on Firm’s Cost of Equity Capital
  • Quihong Zhao
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Placement: University of Missouri at Columbia
    Dissertation: Credit Rating Agency Efficiency: Credit Watch, Monitoring Role, and Effects of Earnings Management
  • Greg Martin
    Ph.D.: 2009
    Initial Placement: University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
    Current Placement: Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
    Dissertation: Shareholder Rights’ Relation to Earnings Management: A Pre- and Post-Sarbanes Oxley Examination
  • Boochun Jung
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Placement: University of Hawaii, Manoa
    Dissertation: Information Asymmetry and the Relations between Dividend Increases, Risk and Expected Future Earnings Changes
  • Stefan Fafatas
    Ph.D.: 2006
    Placement: Washington & Lee University
    Dissertation: Audit Failure, Auditor Reputation, and Risk Management Strategies
  • Yanhua “Sunny” Yang
    Ph.D.: 2006
    Initial Placement: University of Texas, Austin
    Current Placement: University of Connecticut
    Dissertation: Earnings Management as a Response to the Threat of Exchange Delisting
  • Ran Zhang
    Ph.D.: 2006
    Placement: Peking University
    Dissertation: Cash Flow Management and Its Market Pricing

Finance

  • Nhan Le
    Ph.D.: 2012
    Placement: Post Doc at Mannheim Business School, Germany
    Dissertation: Essays in Empirical Corporate Finance
  • Ying Xiao
    Ph.D.: 2011
    Placement: Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY
    Dissertation: Essays in Pre-IPO R&D and Growth
  • Yang Ho Park
    Ph.D.: 2011
    Placement: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
    Dissertation: Two Essays on Options Market
  • Jun Lu
    Ph.D.: 2011
    Placement: Central University of Finance and Economics in Beijing, China
    Dissertation: Size, Leverage and Risk-taking of Financial Institutions
  • Jeffrey Merrell
    Ph.D.: 2011
    Placement: United States Air Force Academy
    Dissertation: Essays on Legal Origin and Corporate Governance: Evidence from Louisiana and Quebec
  • Surasak Ngammekchai
    Ph.D.: 2008
    Placement: Central University of Finance and Economics in Beijing, China
    Dissertation: How to Human Capital Assets Affect Cumulative Abnormal Returns During Merger and Acquisition?
  • Wei Wang
    Ph.D.: 2008
    Placement: University of New Orleans
    Dissertation: Two Essays on IPO Information Revelation
  • Moonsoo Kang
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Initial Placement: Loyola College
    Current Placement: Iona College
    Dissertation: Does More Informed Trading Necessarily Lead to Higher Expected Returns
  • Stefan Platikanov
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Placement: Suffolk University
    Dissertation: Essays on Firm Investments and Financial Constraints
  • Brian Bolton
    Ph.D.: 2006
    Initial Placement: University of New Hampshire
    Current Placement: Portland State University
    Dissertation: Corporate Governance and Firm Performance

Marketing

  • Ji Hoon Jhang
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: Oklahoma State University
    Dissertation: Two Essays on Consumers' Goal Proximity and Inter-temporal Choice
  • Kelly Herd
    Ph.D.: 2011
    Placement: Indiana University, Bloomington
    Dissertation: Identity and Product Design
  • Ethan Pew
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Initial Placement: American University
    Current Placement: Stony Brook University
    Dissertation: Regulatory Fit Can Be More Than a Feeling: Evidence of Facilitated Processing for Prevention Fit in Investment Decision-Making Contexts
  • Caleb Warren
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Placement: Bocconi University, Milano, Italy
    Dissertation: What Makes Things Cool and Why Marketers Should Care
  • Qiuping Li
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Placement: University of Nebraska, Kearney
    Dissertation: Memory Reconstruction and Consumer Decision Making
  • Mark Ratchford
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Placement: Vanderbilt University
    Dissertation: Resource-Based Coalitions in Marketing Channels: A Cooperative Game Theoretic Analysis
  • Gina Mohr
    Ph.D.: 2009
    Placement: Colorado State University
    Dissertation: When Are Decisions Difficult? Goal Conflict and Compromise in Negatively Correlated Choice Environments
  • Rajesh Bagchi
    Ph.D.: 2008
    Placement: Virginia Tech University
    Dissertation: Reading the Seller’s Face: Moderating Effects on How Seller Concession Patterns Influence Buyer Price Expectations

Information Management

  • Jingjing Li
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: Microsoft
    Dissertation: Addressing Information Proliferation: Applications of Information Extraction and Text Mining
  • Tomasz Miaskiewicz
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Initial Placement: The New University of Lisbon
    Current Placement: NOVA School of Business and Economics
    Dissertation: Bridging the Gap Between Consumers and Designers: The Role of Accurate and Effective Personas
  • Zainab AlQenaei
    Ph.D.: 2009
    Placement: Kuwait University
    Dissertation: An Investigation of the Relationship Between Consumer Mental Health Recovery Measures and Clinicians’ Reports Using Multivariate Analysis of the Singular Value Decomposition of a Textual Corpus
  • Dirk Hovorka
    Ph.D.: 2006
    Placement: Bond University, Australia
    Dissertation: Information Systems Foundations: Four Research Essays

Operations Management

  • Subhamoy Ganguly
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: Indian Institute of Management – Udaipur
    Dissertation: Essays in Scheduling: Applications in Health Care and Manufacturing
  • Michele Samorani
    Ph.D.: 2012
    Placement: University of Alberta, Canada
    Dissertation: Data Mining For Enhanced Operations Management Decision Making: Applications in Health Care
  • Harald Reinertsen
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Placement: Smith Stål Øst AS, Norway
    Dissertation: Optimization of the Industrial Cutting Stock Problems – Production Scheduling in a Dynamic Stochastic Environment
  • Marco Better
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Placement: OptTek Systems, Inc.
    Dissertation: Data Mining Techniques for Prediction in Discrete Data Applications
  • Fang Liang
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Placement: PROS Pricing Solutions
    Dissertation: The Hyperplan-Based Classification Techniques
  • Rahul Patil
    Ph.D.: 2006
    Placement: Indian Institute of Management
    Dissertation: Improved Techniques for Due Date Quotation in Realistic Production Environments

Strategic, Organizational, and Entrepreneurial Studies

  • Richard Hunt
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: Institute of Behavioral Sciences, CU Boulder
    Dissertation: Essays Concerning the Entry and Survival Strategies of Entrepreneurial Firms: A Transaction Persective
  • Shayne Kiefer
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: U.S. Air Force Academy
    Dissertation: Predicting and Examining Links Between IPO Hype, Managerial Expectations, and Firm Outcomes
  • Daniel Lerner
    Ph.D.: 2013
    Placement: University of Deusto, Spain
    Dissertation: Opportunity Pursuit and the Disinhibition Paradox
  • Kenneth Younge
    Ph.D.: 2012
    Initial Placement: Post Doc at the University of California, Berkeley
    Current Placement: Purdue University
    Dissertation: Employee Mobility and the Appropriation of Value from Knowledge: Evidence from Three Essays
    Winner of the Wiley-Blackwell Outstanding Dissertation Award, Business Policy & Strategy, 2013 Academy of Management Annual Meeting
  • Patrick Heflin
    Ph.D.: 2012
    Placement: United States Air Force Academy
    Dissertation: Resistance and Compliance: Employee Reaction to Bureaucratic Control Measures in Autonomous Work Settings
  • Markus Fitza
    Ph.D.: 2010
    Initial Placement: Bentley University
    Current Placement: Texas A&M University
    Dissertation: IPO Underpricing From the Perspective of the Issuing Firm: Money Left on the Table or Strategic Gain?
    Finalist of the Wiley-Blackwell Outstanding Dissertation Award (one of seven), Business Policy & Strategy, 2011 Academy of Management Annual Meeting
  • Marilyn Uy
    Ph.D.: 2009
    Initial Placement: University of Victoria, Canada
    Current Placement: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
    Dissertation: The Roller Coaster Ride: Affective Influences in Entrepreneurial Efforts
  • Desiree Pacheco
    Ph.D.: 2009
    Placement: Portland State University
    Dissertation: The Quest for Legitimacy in Nascent Industries: Exploring the Interplay Across Institutional Actors in the Emergence of Renewable Energy Sectors
  • Asad Aziz
    Ph.D.: 2008
    Placement: Colorado State University
    Dissertation: Striving or Coasting on Collective Tasks: A Regulatory Focus Perspective
  • Charles Murnieks
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Placement: United States Air Force Academy
    Dissertation: Who Am I? The Quest for an Entrepreneurial Identity and an Investigation of its Relationship to Entrepreneurial Passion and Goal-Setting
  • Joy Godesiabois
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Initial Placement: Northeastern University
    Current Placement: Colorado School of Mines
    Dissertation: The Rise and Decline of Social Capitalists: A Longitudinal Study of Social Capital and Performance Among Startups in the Venture Capital Industry
  • Lawrence Plummer
    Ph.D.: 2007
    Initial Placement: Clemson University
    Current Placement: University of Oklahoma
    Dissertation: Good Neighbors or Bad? A Time-Space Model of the Effects of Entrepreneurial Entry on the Profits of Post-IPO Firms

Funding

The Leeds School of Business generally funds all of its Ph.D. students, both international and domestic. All applicants to the Leeds Ph.D. program who submit complete applications by the January 15 deadline are considered for funding. There is no funding application form. Those who have outside funding (government, military, etc.) should make note of that on the Ph.D. Applicant Information Form that is required as part of the application packet.

Tuition Waiver and Stipend

Students who are on funding work 20 hours per week as research and/or teaching assistants. They receive a full tuition waiver and a monthly stipend during the 9-month academic year. The 2012-2013 stipend is $19,760 for the academic year. The tuition waiver is equal to approximately $13,950 for a Colorado resident, and $29,448 for a non-Colorado residents. Students who are on funding for 20 hours per week also receive a partial waiver of student health insurance costs for the Student Gold plan. See the Wardenburg Health Center for details on student health insurance.

While the continuation of funding is contingent on satisfactory performance in the Ph.D. program, most students are funded for four years. Students may apply to the Doctoral Curriculum and Policy Committee (DCPC) for a fifth year of funding.

Summer Support

Summer funding is available through several different sources, including teaching and fellowships.

Business doctoral students may apply for a summer Gerald Hart Doctoral Research Fellowship. The Hart Fellowship program is designed to encourage and reward early involvement in scholarly research and publication by providing doctoral students with summer funding to work with a faculty member on a research project.

Doctoral students are sometimes supported by individual divisions or faculty members to assist faculty with research projects.

Information about other funding opportunities is available through the University of Colorado Boulder's Graduate School.

Research Requirements

Leeds faculty are actively engaged in cutting-edge research and scholarship. They enjoy working with Ph.D. students and view their mentoring role as an integral part of their scholarship.

The Leeds Ph.D. Program focuses on developing the necessary skills for the design and execution of original, innovative research, and for the dissemination of knowledge through teaching and writing. To accomplish this Ph.D. students must fulfill several important research requirements:

Research Assistant Assignments

A fundamental part of a Ph.D. education is working closely with faculty on research projects. During most semesters a Ph.D. student will be assigned to faculty research projects as a research assistant. This introduces students to the practice and process of academic research under the guidance of experienced faculty. RA assignments are made each semester in consultation with area faculty and Ph.D. students.

Summer Research Projects

During the first two summers of their enrollment, Ph.D. students are expected to work on significant research projects that result in conference presentations and publishable papers. During at least one of the two summers, students are expected to apply for and be awarded a Gerald Hart Summer Research Fellowship. A requirement of the Hart Fellowship is that a paper resulting from the research be presented at a Leeds School workshop during the academic year following the award.

Dissertation

Ph.D. students normally undertake the writing of a dissertation during the third and fourth years of their time as Ph.D. students. Dissertation topics are usually identified through coursework, through research projects with faculty, and from a student's own interests. It is important that your dissertation topic have the support and interest of the faculty in your area in order for you to make good progress toward its completion. Students select a dissertation advisor from the faculty whose research and interests match those of the proposed dissertation.

Most faculty members enjoy working with Ph.D. students and are pleased when asked to work with a student as a dissertation advisor. Working with the dissertation advisor, the student will prepare a Dissertation Proposal that is formally reviewed by the faculty during an oral presentation. The faculty may make recommendations for modifying the plan. Once the faculty approves a proposal, it becomes a template for completing the dissertation. A dissertation committee of five faculty will also be formed following the proposal. Upon completion of the dissertation and with approval of the dissertation advisor, the student will present and defend the dissertation during a formal oral Dissertation Defense presented to the dissertation committee, and other interested faculty and students. The committee may either approve the defense or ask that additional work be accomplished before granting approval.

Research Papers & Publications

In addition to successful completion of a dissertation, Ph.D. students are well-advised to complete and submit several research papers for publication prior to graduation. Faculty typically provide students with ample coauthoring opportunities during the course of the program. These papers can be from summer research projects, from dissertation research, or from other research projects. Papers may be coauthored with faculty and/or other Ph.D. students, or may be solo efforts. Placement prospects are much brighter for those students with submitted and published papers.

Teaching Requirements

All funded Leeds School of Business Ph.D. students teach three courses during the first four years of their program. Students who have outside funding are expected to teach one class during the first four years of their program. Teaching assignments are determined by the division chair in consultation with the division's Ph.D. program director. During semesters that they are teaching students do not have additional RA or TA assignments.

Teaching Workshops

All Ph.D. students must attend at least 13 Graduate Teaching Program workshops, at least three of which must be co-sponsored by the Leeds School and offered by Leeds School faculty. The Graduate Teaching Program offers workshops throughout the year. A schedule of their workshops can be found on their website. The Leeds School teaching workshops vary from year to year, and are generally offered during spring semester.

English Language Skills

English speaking skills are vitally important to teaching. Prior to the beginning of their first semester, all non-native English speakers are required to take the CU-Boulder English Placement Test through the Division of Continuing Education and Professional Studies' International English Center. English as a Second Language (ESL) courses are available for those who need to increase their English intelligibility for success in academic communication.

Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

What is the purpose of the Ph.D. degree?

  • The Ph.D. program at the Leeds School of Business is designed to educate scholars for work as faculty members at other top-tier, research-oriented business schools in the United States and around the world. It is not intended to train individuals whose primary interest is teaching, or who desire to return to work in business and industry.

Can I earn a Ph.D. in business at the Leeds School while working?

  • The Leeds Ph.D. Program is a demanding full-time program intended to train students for a lifetime of scholarship. Given its demands, it is not possible or reasonable to work full-time or part-time in another activity and successfully complete a doctorate at the Leeds School at the same time.

Do you offer a distance learning Ph.D. program?

  • No. Our program is full-time and requires students to be in residence at least during the coursework phase of the program. Most students remain in residence throughout their entire program.

If I graduate with a Ph.D. from the Leeds School, can I possibly get a job at the Leeds School?

  • No. A widespread policy of universities around the country is that doctoral programs do not hire their own graduates. This insures that programs do not become ingrown and that scholarship is disseminated widely.

Admissions

What are the admission requirements?

  • Students applying to the Leeds Ph.D. Program must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited university or college. A masters-level degree is not required. Previous academic studies do not need to be in business, economics, or related fields. Leeds Ph.D. students come from diverse backgrounds including engineering, psychology, political science, other liberal arts, and the sciences. A complete description of the application process can be found on the Admissions page.

How do you make admission decisions?

  • Since our goal is to educate students for careers in research and teaching at major universities, we evaluate applicants on their prospects of becoming leading scholars in their areas. We take into account previous academic performance, work experience, test scores, and any other activities that present evidence of tenacity and scholarly potential. Since this evaluation is necessarily subjective, it is difficult to make categorical statements about what it takes to ensure admission to the Leeds Ph.D. Program.

Do I need to take the GMAT or GRE?

  • Yes, you must submit either GMAT or GRE scores as part of your application regardless of your previous educational experience. We do not waive this requirement. Your scores must be less than 5 years old as of the application deadline.
  • We prefer applicants with scores above the 90th percentile. In recent years admitted students who submitted GMAT scores have had an average score of 700. Admitted students who submitted GRE scores have had an average composite score (quantitative plus verbal) of 1313.

Do I need an MS or MBA degree?

  • No, you do not need to have an advanced degree for admittance to the Leeds Ph.D. Program. Many of our students enter the program with an undergraduate degree only. However, a graduate degree may help your application by demonstrating a foundation for advanced doctoral level work and by indicating your ability to do graduate-level work.

Do I need work experience?

  • Work experience is not a prerequisite for admission to the Leeds Ph.D. Program, but relevant experience can demonstrate a useful foundation for advanced doctoral level scholarship. Many of our students have worked for at least several years before joining our program.

How selective is the program?

  • Admission to any top doctoral program is highly selective and the Leeds Ph.D. Program is no exception. We receive dozens of applications annually in each area of study, but can admit an average of only two students per area. Actual admission ratios vary by year and by area.

How often do you admit students?

  • We admit students once a year. Application materials are due in January for admission the following fall semester. We do not admit students to start in the spring semester.

How do I schedule a visit?

  • Finalists for admission will be invited to campus in the spring; however, you are welcome to schedule a visit earlier on your own. If you would like to meet with a Doctoral Program Director you should contact that person directly to set up an appointment. Their names and contact information can be found on the Staff page. Campus tours are available from the university's Office of Admission.

The Leeds Ph.D. Program

What is the structure and time-line of the Leeds Ph.D. Program?

  • The Ph.D. program takes 4-5 years to complete. Typically the first two years are devoted to courses, with the remaining years devoted to researching and writing a dissertation. During the first four years of the program Ph.D. students also teach 3 classes, and work as research and/or teaching assistants.

How many courses are required?

  • You will need to complete at least 30 credit hours (10 courses) of graduate-level coursework and 30 hours of dissertation credit while enrolled in the Leeds Ph.D. Program. Many students take additional courses beyond this minimum in order to provide a better foundation for their dissertation research. Your curriculum will be determined by the requirements of your doctoral area, by your research interests, and by the advice of your doctoral advisors.

Can I transfer in credits from another university?

  • You can transfer up to 9 credit hours into the Leeds Ph.D. Program. The eligibility of transfer credits is determined by your area of study, by the faculty in your area, and by your research interests. Transfer credit must also be approved by the Graduate School. Approval of transfer credit cannot be done prior to admission. Doctoral students generally take 30 credit-hours of graduate coursework at CU regardless of their previous studies.

Will I work on faculty research projects?

  • A fundamental part of a doctoral education is working closely with faculty on research projects. For the first several years of your program you will work closely with faculty members on their research projects as a research assistant and during the summers on joint research papers. As you develop your dissertation you will begin to work more independently, but still under guidance of your faculty advisors. Beyond graduation many doctoral students choose to work with their dissertation advisors on ongoing research projects.

Will I do any teaching as a doctoral student?

  • An important part of your training as a doctoral student is to develop and refine your skills as a teacher. Consequently, the Leeds Ph.D. Program requires that its students attend 10 Graduate Teacher Program workshops and 3 Leeds School teaching workshops. While in the program, funded doctoral students must teach 3 courses during regular fall and spring semesters. Details about teaching can be found on the Teaching Requirements page of this website.

Ph.D. Student Life

What is life like as a Ph.D. student?

  • Life as a doctoral student is not unlike life as any student, except that it is far less structured. Coursework comprises only a fraction of a doctoral student’s time, with research activities comprising the remainder. Research by its nature is unstructured and exploratory, so the path ahead often is not obvious. Tenacity and self-motivation are paramount to success.

Will I receive any financial support as a Ph.D. student?

  • Yes. Students in the Leeds Ph.D. Program receive a full tuition waiver, a portion of health insurance costs, and stipend as long as they are in good standing with the department. Students work approximately 20 hours per week as research and/or teaching assistants in return for support. The 2012-2013 stipend is $19,760 for the nine-month academic year. While the continuation of financial aid is contingent on satisfactory performance, most students are funded for four years. Students may apply to the Doctoral Curriculum and Policy Committee (DCPC) to request a fifth year of funding. Fifth-year funding decisions are based a combination of factors including available funds, the student's progress in the program, and the division's support of the student.

Are there other ways to earn money as a Ph.D. student?

  • Doctoral students can earn additional money through summer teaching, summer research fellowships, or taking on additional RA and TA assignments beyond the 20 hours per week required. Students must be careful to balance the demands of their doctoral studies with the amount of additional work that they take on.

Will I have an office or place to work? What about computers?

  • All Leeds Ph.D. students are assigned an office. Offices generally are shared with one or more other students.
  • There are several computers, a printer, and a copier available for student use in a doctoral computer lab at the Leeds School of Business. Most students bring their own personal computers for use in their offices and the classrooms.

Video

Ph.D. Student Wins National Marketing Award

We celebrate award-winning Ph.D. student Kelly Herd.

Staff

Jennifer Dittenhofer
Program Assistant
303.492.4984
Koelbel 451
Nathalie Moyen
Finance Program Director
303.735.4931
Koelbel 483
Tony Tong
Strategic, Organizational, and Entrepreneurial Studies Program Director
303.492.8854
Koelbel 401
Curriculum Vitae
Thomas Vossen
Operations & Information Systems Program Director
303.735.2446
Koelbel S444

Current Students

As of Fall 2013 we have 45 students in our Ph.D. program in the following areas of study:

  • Accounting: 10 students
  • Finance: 11 students
  • Marketing: 10 students
  • Information & Operations Management: 5 students
  • Strategic, Organizations, and Entreprenuerial Studies: 9 students

The average age of our students is 30, with an age range of 22 to 42.

Nineteen women and twenty six men are currently enrolled. Sixteen of our students are international—from Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong, India, Korea, Kuwait, United Kingdom, and Vietnam.



Anil Abbaraju
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 455
Abdul Rahman Al Taweel
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 471
Amber Alfano
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 466
Saad Alnahedh
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 473
Leah Baer
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 473
Gustaf Bellstam
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 473
Jonathan Black
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 466
Adam Bordeman
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 466
Robyn Brooks
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 473
David Brown
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel S442
Carla Bustamante
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 421
Erin Carter
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 464
Elsa Chan
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 468
Michael Conger
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 463
Marc Cussatt
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel S438
Jennifer Dinger
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 421
Curriculum Vitae
James Endicott
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 455
Judith Hermis
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 473
Ji Hoon Jhang
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Bharadwaj Kannan
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 453
Jessica Kirk
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 463
Bridget Leonard
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 469
Daniel Lerner
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 463
Andrew Long
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 463
Jason Lunn
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel S442
Michael Manser
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 453
Jordan Martel
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 473
Heeyoung “Lauren” Min
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 463
Francisco Morales
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 463
Paul Parkinson
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 464
Andrea Pawliczek
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 472
Jose Ramirez
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 467
Caleb Rawson
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 473
Julie Schiro
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 465
Abigail Schneider
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 469
Allison Scott
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 464
Jaebong Son
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 463
Subhiksha Swamy
Ph.D. Student
Finance
Koelbel 465
Jeffrey Sweeney
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 467
An T. Tran
Ph.D. Student
Marketing
Koelbel 458
Curriculum Vitae
Siddharth Vedula
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 463
Jessica Weber
Ph.D. Student
Accounting
Koelbel 457
Wei Yang
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 468
Mark Zais
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 467
Yuchen Zhang
Ph.D. Student
Management & Entrepreneurship
Koelbel 473

Contact

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